Pro Tips When Buying a Home

Get the most out of your money with these helpful home-buying tips.

Don’t Try to Time the Market

Don’t obsess with trying to time the market and figure out when is the best time to buy. Trying to anticipate the housing market is impossible. The best time to buy is when you find your perfect house and you can afford it. Real estate is cyclical, it goes up and it goes down and it goes back up again. So, if you try to wait for the perfect time, you’re probably going to miss out.

Keep Your Money Where It Is

It’s not wise to make any huge purchases or move your money around three to six months before buying a new home. You don’t want to take any big chances with your credit profile. Lenders need to see that you’re reliable and they want a complete paper trail so that they can get you the best loan possible. If you open new credit cards, amass too much debt or buy a lot of big-ticket items, you’re going to have a hard time getting a loan.

Get Pre-Approved for Your Home Loan

There’s a big difference between a buyer being pre-qualified and a buyer who has a pre-approved mortgage. Anybody can get pre-qualified for a loan. Getting pre-approved means a lender has looked at all your financial information and they’ve let you know how much you can afford and how much they will lend you. Being pre-approved will save you a lot of time and energy so you are not running around looking at houses you can’t afford. It also gives you the opportunity to shop around for the best deal and the best interest rates. Do your research: Learn about junk fees, processing fees or points and make sure there aren’t any hidden costs in the loan.

 Stalk the Neighborhood

Before you buy, get the lay of the land – drop by morning noon and night. Many home buyers have become completely distraught because they thought they found the perfect home, only to find out the neighborhood wasn’t for them. Drive by the house at all hours of the day to see what’s happening in the neighborhood. Do your regular commute from the house to make sure it is something you can deal with daily. Find out how far it is to the nearest grocery store and other services. Even if you don’t have kids, research the schools because it affects the value of your home in a very big way. If you buy a house in a good school district versus bad school district even in the same town, the value can be affected as much as 20 percent.

Bigger Isn’t Always Better 

Everyone’s drawn to the biggest, most beautiful house on the block. But bigger is usually not better when it comes to houses. There’s an adage in real estate that says don’t buy the biggest, best house on the block. The largest house only appeals to a very small audience and you never want to limit potential buyers when you go to re-sell. Your home is only going to go up in value as much as the other houses around you. If you pay $500,000 for a home and your neighbors pay $250,000 to $300,000, your appreciation is going to be limited. Sometimes it is best to is buy the worst house on the block, because the worst house per square foot always trades for more than the biggest house.

The Secret Science of Bidding

Your opening bid should be based on two things: what you can afford (because you don’t want to outbid yourself), and what you really believe the property is worth. Make your opening bid something that’s fair and reasonable and isn’t going to totally offend the seller. A lot of people think they should go lower the first time they make a bid. It all depends on what the market is doing at the time. You need to look at what other homes have gone for in that neighborhood and you want to get an average price per square foot. Sizing up a house on a price-per-square-foot basis is a great equalizer. Also, see if the neighbors have plans to put up a new addition or a basketball court or tennis court, something that might detract from the property’s value down the road.

Today, so many sellers are behind in their property taxes and if you have that valuable information it gives you a great card to negotiate a good deal. To find out, go to the county clerk’s office.

Sellers respect a bid that is an oddball number and are more likely to take it more seriously. A nice round number sounds like every other bid out there. When you get more specific the sellers will think you’ve given the offer careful thought.

Give Your House a Physical

Would you buy a car without checking under the hood? Of course, you wouldn’t. Hire a home inspector. It’ll cost about $400 but could end up saving you thousands. A home inspector’s sole responsibility is to provide you with information so that you can decide as to whether to buy. It’s really the only way to get an unbiased third-party opinion. If the inspector does find any issues with the home, you can use it as a bargaining tool for lowering the price of the home. It’s better to spend the money up front on an inspector than to find out later you must spend a fortune.

Avoid Unexpected Costs

The difference between renting and home ownership is the unexpected costs. Most people just focus on their mortgage payment, but they also need to be aware of the other expenses such as property taxes, utilities and homeowner-association dues. New homeowners also need to be prepared to pay for repairs, maintenance and potential property-tax increases. Make sure you budget for unexpected costs, so you’ll be covered and won’t risk losing your house.

Work with a Pro When Buying a Home

Working with a professional real estate agent is the ideal way to buy home. An experienced agent can help you get the most for your investment. The right agent will help you by providing pertinent information. They can guide you without overwhelming you.

Some buyers erroneously believe they should work directly with the agent that is representing the home (listing agent). The challenge with this is that the listing agent has a fiduciary responsibility to work for his client, the seller’s best interests.

An agent representing you, the buyer, has a fiduciary responsibility to work on behalf of your best interests.

The real estate agents at Haven Real Estate Group are experienced, professional, and are ready to help you every step of the way. Call Cambria Henry (Owner and Managing Broker at Haven Real Estate Group) directly at 509-255-3764 to work with a highly skilled and top rated agent!

Recommended Mortgage Questions Resource:

Dan Sweeney,
Area Manager
Envoy Mortgage
NMLS #136541
(509) 818-7497
DSweeney@envoymortgage.com
www.EnvoySpokane.com

Cambria Henry

Owner / Managing Broker
(509) 255-3764
Reviews on Zillow

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